L to R: Betty Woodman, Charles Woodman, and Francesca Woodman, 1959 / George Woodman and Francesca Woodman, 1964 / Francesca Woodman, 1964 / 4-5: Charles Woodman, 1962 / Betty Woodman, 1959.
Betty Woodman, Charles Woodman, and Francesca Woodman, 1959
Summer with the Woodman family, 1959-1964: STAFF PICKS
Emma Horning is a Library and Information Science graduate student at University of Wisconsin Milwaukee. As the Foundation’s Archives Intern, she has been digitizing photographic slides and prints in the collection and building a database to manage these archival materials: Summer brings us bountiful sun-drenched days. As a family, the Woodmans spent the summer months soaking in the potential the season brings.
L to R: All artworks by George Woodman. “Untitled,” 1969, ed. of 22. 20 x 28 in / “Untitled,” 1968, ed. of 19. 22 1/2 x 30 in. “Untitled,” c. 1970s. 28 x 20 in / “La Nuvola II,” 1970, ed. of 11. 39 1/4 x 28 in / All screenprints on paper.
George Woodman. “Untitled,” 1969, ed. of 22. 20 x 28 in. Screenprint on paper.
George Woodman's screenprints, c. 1960s-70s: STAFF PICKS
Lissa McClure, The Woodman Family Foundation’s Executive Director: When I began at the Foundation three years ago, after knowing Betty and George for over a decade, I thought I knew most of the work each of the Woodmans had made. I soon realized how wrong I was! One of the biggest surprises, and a pure delight, was encountering George Woodman’s early prints from the ‘60s and ‘70s.
L to R: George Woodman, c. 1960s-1990s.
George Woodman, c. 1960s.
George Woodman's summer travels, c. 1960s-1990s: From the Archives...
Here are a series of portraits of George Woodman, an avid world traveler. George soaked up endless inspiration for art making and life on the family's summer travels throughout the years.
L to R: The Woodman family and friends throughout the years in Antella, Italy, c. 1960s-2010s.
The Woodman family and friends, Antella, Italy, c. 1960s.
The breakfast nook, Antella, Italy, c. 1960s-2010s: From the Archives...
For over fifty years, the Woodman family has enjoyed many meals and conversations in the breakfast nook at their farmhouse in Antella, Italy. Built in a circular space that had originally housed a brick oven, the nook overlooks the hills of Tuscany and spectacular sunsets.
L to R: Various installation views: "Pitti rivisatto,” Palazzo Pitti, Florence, Italy, 1997 / All artworks by George Woodman. Image 2: “Pitti, Medea, Roses,” c. 1988. 41 1/4 x 72 in / Image 4: “Untitled,” 1990. 41 1/4 x 78 in / Image 6: “Untitled,” c. 1990s. 24 x 20 in / Image 9: “Untitled,” 1990. 41 1/4 x 59 in. All gelatin silver prints.
Installation view, "Pitti rivisatto,” Palazzo Pitti, Florence, Italy, 1997.
George Woodman, “Pitti rivisatto," Palazzo Pitti, Florence, Italy, 1997: From the Archives...
Twenty-five years ago this month, George Woodman’s solo exhibition, "Pitti rivisatto," opened at the Palazzo Pitti in Florence, and remained on view all summer long. His layered black and white photographs take this Renaissance palace as their subject, but also as an opportunity to reflect on time and the experiences carried within each viewer.
.L to R: Artworks by George Woodman. "War Sadness Escape," 1999. 42 x 39 in. Gelatin silver print / Images 2 & 4: Installation views, “Contrapposto & Other Stories,” Jeff Bailey Gallery, New York, 2014 / "Boboli: Fountain of Neptune,” 1997. 71 3/4 x and 41 1/4 in. Gelatin silver print.
George Woodman. “War Sadness Escape,” 1999. 42 x 39 in. Gelatin silver print.
George Woodman's camera obscura photographs in "Contrapposto & Other Stories," Jeff Bailey Gallery, New York, 2014: From the Archives...
Summertime is here again, and each year it has brought with it a fresh crop of summer group shows around New York City. Here’s one from 2014: George Woodman’s camera obscura photographs were included in “Contrapposto & Other Stories,” curated by Katia Rosenthal at Jeff Bailey Gallery in Chelsea.
L to R: George Woodman in his early studio, Albuquerque, c. 1950s / George Woodman with one of his paintings, Boulder, c. 1970s / George Woodman in his studio, New York, c. 2000s.
George Woodman in his early studio, Albuquerque, c. 1950s.
George Woodman, born on this day in 1932: From the Archives...
"At age fourteen I decided to become an artist, ambition enough for my life,” George Woodman once wrote. And over the next seven decades, he did just that, working fervently as a painter and photographer, and also as a writer and professor. Today, we celebrate George, who was born on this day in 1932!
L to R: All artworks by George Woodman. Exhibition poster for ‘George Woodman,’ Spectrum Gallery, 1970 / “Untitled,” c. 1968-69. 30 x 22 1/4 in. Screenprint on paper / “Untitled,” 1969. 60 x 60 in. Acrylic paint on canvas.
Exhibition poster for ‘George Woodman,’ Spectrum Gallery, 1970.
George Woodman, Spectrum Gallery, 1970: From the Archives...
Fifty-two years ago this week would have been your last chance to see George Woodman’s solo exhibition at Spectrum Gallery in New York City. Woodman’s canvases and prints during this period were characterized by fields of interlocking, repetitive shapes, which, as Robert Berlind later described: “may be seen as a reprise of the transition earlier in the century from a still-descriptive cubism to a “purer” non-referentiality. These paintings are equally in keeping with the contemporaneous interests of Op Art and made a crucial contribution to the Criss-Cross movement which flourished in the 70’s in Boulder and had an impact on the New York scene.”
L to R: Images 1-3: Processing George Woodman’s paper tiles in our archive, 2022 / Images 4-5: George Woodman’s paper tile installation, Denver Art Museum, 1980 / Images 6-7: George Woodman’s paper tile installation, unknown location, 1981.
Processing George Woodman’s paper tiles in our archive, 2022.
George Woodman's paper tiles, 1980-81: From the Archives...
Although the Woodman Family Foundation archives are starting to take shape, there is still much more material to process before we are ready to open them up to scholars and researchers. Currently, we are processing George Woodman’s paper tiles and related plans, descriptions and documentation so that we can better understand this key aspect of his practice, which took his work with pattern off the canvas and into space and situation.
L to R: All artworks by George Woodman. “Cannon," 1980. 66 x 66 in. Acrylic paint on canvas / Images 2-6: Pages from the exhibition catalogue for “19 Artists—Emergent Americans,” The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York / "La Grande Fontaine du Printemps," 1980. 85 x 84 in. Acrylic paint on canvas / "Tessellation Sky,” 1975. 54 1/2 x 54 1/2 in. Acrylic paint on canvas. Collection The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum.
George Woodman. “Cannon," 1980. 66 x 66 in. Acrylic paint on canvas.
George Woodman, "19 Artists—Emergent Americans," The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, 1981: From the Archives...
Forty-one years ago, 19 Artists—Emergent Americans was presented at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York featuring seven paintings by George Woodman, among work by eighteen of his contemporaries including Barbara Kruger, Guy de Cointet, and Manny Farber. The exhibition reflected curator Peter Frank’s desire to present the artists’ work as a series of small retrospectives. “What I have sought to assemble at the Guggenheim Museum is the skilled and confident visual articulation of engrossing ideas by individuals who have not been sufficiently recognized for their accomplishment,” he wrote.